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Sophie Gilbert and David Sims will be discussing the new season of Netflix’s Black Mirror, considering alternate episodes. I’m such a devoted Andrea Riseborough fan that I’d pay money to watch her read the phone book, so the episode felt like a colossal disappointment.

I’m so fascinated by how they choose the episode order of seasons.

Who decided to make the first story most viewers will see in the series one where the British Prime Minister has sex with a pig?

If you’re bingeing Season 4, what’s the emotional impact of swooping from the kitschy “USS Callister” to the bleak “Arkangel” to the even bleaker “Crocodile” to an episode like “Hang the DJ”—a segue that needs a Monty Python–esque disclaimer of, “And now for something completely different”?

I enjoyed “Hang the DJ” a lot, although it sagged a little in the middle, like episodes tend to do.

But the twist in the end turned a sweet-love-story-slash-Tinder-fable into something more intriguing, and the way the chapter hinted at a larger conspiracy throughout was masterfully structured.

In the episode’s concept, Frank (Joe Cole) and Amy (Georgina Campbell) are both new members of a dating program that pairs them up for dinner.

So far, so conventional—but there are signs that something is different.

Two bouncers lurk menacingly on the periphery, providing some sense that the dates in this world aren’t optional.

And Frank and Amy both have handheld devices that show them how long their relationship is going to last, which in this case is 12 hours. It feels at first like this is going to be a satire about snowflake millennials who don’t have the emotional maturity to actually date like adults.

Self-driving buggies transport them to a cabin, where they’re given the option to sleep together, or not. But there are other questions hovering around: Why do Frank, Amy, and all these other attractive young adults live inside some kind of sealed dome, “Hang the DJ,” directed by the TV veteran Tim Van Patten, has the artificial-world sheen of “Nosedive,” with its brightly colored cabins, soulless restaurants, and ubiquitous talking devices.

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